Italoboyz Q&A

Welcome to Magazine Sixty, Marco and Federico. Let’s start with your new single: Midnight Summer Dream for Crosstown Rebels. How did your relationship with the Crosstown come about? And how important for you is it to have your music released on such a significant label?

Hi guys, it’s a pleasure to be here! We have known Damian for many, many years, and doing something together was just a matter of time, really… We have endless respect for him and his music, and for what Crosstown Rebels represents. It’s great to be able to finally have found something special that fits with the label.

Talk us through how the track was created, where the original ideas came from and the use of the spoken words?

The spoken words are a little bit of a mystery… the rest of the track was made by arpeggiating a very nice yet simple melody with a Korg Polysix. All the drums are made with the Roland 909 and with a Roland Handsonic, and then there are several other little random sounds that came from…somewhere. It came out spontaneously in a day, there’s no big deal behind this track, it was just one of those moments when things come up naturally and everything flows

pre-order: https://www.beatport.com/release/midnight-summer-dream/2483963

Tell us about the choice of the brilliant Yulia Niko to remix Midnight Summer Dream? And how do you feel she has contributed to the track?

She is part of the Crosstown Rebels family and she did a very good job, her remix takes a completely different direction, and is a great addition to the release.

The second track: 5.05 AM was created along with Blind Minded. And reaches an amazing seventeen plus minutes. You also mentioned experimenting with guitars and pedals in that process, which ones appealed to you most? And how did it feel using an organic instrument such as a guitar as opposed to a synthesizer?

We have a quite long history of making music with organic elements and different instruments…. We’ve collaborated with many musicians in the past, including drummers, bass guitarist, guitars, violin players, trumpet players, etc), I could name dozen of songs we did by recordings musical elements and then adding our own twist, our FXs, our “touch”. We always did and we will always continue doing it. Watch out also for March, we are going to release on This and That Label a collaboration we did with a guy who plays Hang.

Listening to your recent mix for bloop. radio you impressively cross a diverse selection of genres and moods. Tell us a little about your personal philosophy when it comes to DJ’ing and your thoughts on breaking rules and boundaries?

Bloop radio is run by an amazing team, they give me total freedom on music selection. I l constantly listen to many music genres, and Bloop is the right place to melt them together. When it comes to being a DJ, the main approach is making sure you know exactly where you are. The idea behind the Bloop show is to deliver on the first part of the show a blend of less clubby oriented music, more suitable for an afternoon and the second part more dancy. Same for Dj gigs in clubs or festivals: a dj-set varies, depending on many factors (type of crowd, time, size of the club, how long we are going to play and few others). Breaking rules, being different and taking risks is something that every DJ j should do, in our opinion. But you must be in control of what you are doing and be able to understand when you and the crowd are on the same page. It’s actually one of the best feelings ever, when you know you own it, you feel you are in control of the situation. The same record/tune can either empty the dance- floor or can make people travel to the moon, it just depends on….you.

Who are your most important influences both within and outside of the world of electronic music? And are there any particular writers or creative artists which most appeal to you?

Martin Margiela is a great artist, not just a designer but a full on an artist (in fact in this days he is a painter). He took everything that was already there, he deconstructed and reconstructed, he never showed his face and at a certain point decided that he said what he has to say and he disappeared completely.
Same for Bill Drummond & Jimmy Cauty better know as THE KLF. They Became number one on UK charts with a record made out of already existing records, they wrote a manual about how to do a number one chart song. On 23 August 1994, The KLF – one of Britain’s most incendiary bands, in more ways than one – burned £1m on a remote Scottish island. They then vowed to put their careers on hold for 23 years. So at 23 seconds past midnight on Wednesday, August 23rd, 2017 they made their comeback with a book, launch in Liverpool, called 2023: a trilogy.In all this year they were doing lots of fine art pieces, all secretly. The duo were greeted by 500 fans as they arrived at the News From Nowhere book shop in an ice cream van that played their hit What Time Is Love? and O Sole Mio.
HOW CRAZY/COOL IS THAT!?! ☺
ALSO, A special mention also must be given to Futurism in general… We’ve been milking from those early 1900 poets and artists so much across the years, and also… the vocal of Midnight Summer Dream – that you were asking me about is also, somehow, related to Futurism

How would you describe Superfiction Recordings and what are your forthcoming plans for the label?

Superfiction always wanted to be something that encapsulates our different taste for electronic music, our own space where we don’t need to await any external filter, but we do exactly what we want. It’s born like that and will always be like that. The plan is to keep releasing our music, but with an eye on other people and eventually, more and more collaborations with other dj/producers who we respect and we are inspired by.

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Turn Up The Strobe: The KLF, The Jams, The Timelords – A History. Ian Shirley.

Ian Shirley’s brilliant new book on Bill Drummond and Jimmy Cauty’s various exploits of the music world could be summed up in two words: Incendiary, insightful.
Yes some of the records they made together such as 1988’s Doctorin’ the Tardis may occupy the same realms as Agadoo in history, but then again they also timestamped beautiful, inspirational pieces of music such as their KLF ‘Chill Out’ album which captured those transcendent moments perfectly at the dawn of 1990.

The tale begins referencing The Illuminatus! Trilogy (a series of three novels written by Robert Shea and Robert Anton Wilson) and significantly the ideas emanating there where eventually carried throughout their artistic endeavours. Although, the wildly impressive thing about the background to this story is primarily about Bill Drummond’s time in Liverpool orbiting the chaos of the Punk scene. Big In Japan features as of course does Roger Eagle and Ken Testi’s legendary club Eric’s, situated within the world surrounding all of that exciting possibility. As the adventure expands Drummond manages Echo and the Bunnymen as well as Teardrop Explodes, while running his own label alongside David Balfe the fabulous Zoo Records. Tales are legion around the era. And that is one of the strengths of the book that it covers the exciting times that played out from the late seventies straight through to the 1990’s. Which is of course complimented by the return of KLF at the end of this month in Liverpool.

In-between times the pair joined minds utilising eighties sampling culture through releases such as The Justified Ancients Of Mu Mu ‎highlighting the influence of American rap at the time, just before House Music hit the UK as a cultural force in 1988. Which in turn they absorbed releasing the Acid inspired What Time Is Love alongside a burst of other singles looped around the era.

Possibly, ironically given the strength of this book neither of the protagonists choose to be interviewed for the pages however an excess of source material readily fills in any gaps. Besides, given the pairs’ prevalence for Art inspired pranks, what’s not like about that?

https://www.cherryred.co.uk/product/turn-up-the-strobe-the-klf-the-jams-the-timelords-a-history

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