Luciano – Canción Mapuche – Cadenza

Returning to the Magik Garden Festival late 2019 in Santiago de Chile the artist announces his intentions with this beautifully, haunting song and accompanying hard-hitting production. Expanding across ten minutes the music journeys through a sublime roller-coaster of fiery emotion as subtle percussion underpins the tough bass and kick drum combination. All of which supports Katy Prado’s soulfully charged vocal that says the same universal thing in any given language. A challenging, creative and timeless feeling piece of music, but then would you expect anything less from Luciano.

buy https://www.beatport.com/track/canci-n-mapuche-feat-katy-prado-original-mix/11921677

https://lucianocadenza.com
http://www.cadenzamusic.net

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Ezikiel – Tales of Roots – Cadenza

Never one to do things by halves Cadenza release this fully realised, no comprise journey into sound that will surprise and excite you across a justified fifteen and a bit minutes of detailed excellence. Accompanying the excitable flourishes of guitar are punchy, playful drums plus a feast of melodies amid a sense of anticipation which you feel could just about lead you anywhere. Next, Makha Poetry contrasts perfectly with bold bass stamping its presence all over brash, punctuating drums and layers of semi-revealed voices. Another first-rate release of music.

Release: October 6 (Vinyl)/ October 13 (Digital)

https://www.facebook.com/EZIKIEL-Official-Page-302254544075

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Luciano & David Morales – Esperanza – Cadenza

What I very much love about this record is the fact that neither artist feels the need to replay past glories but seek to engage with the here and now by producing this future-charged killer. Coming prime-timed for the summer season with deep, throbbing drums and bass underpinning gloriously funky percussion, which very much used to be the mainstay of House Music past, now makes an explosive return to form. Both Luciano & David Morales deliver their own excellent interpretations with the formers Flow Latino mix concentrating on a more stripped down, raw-edged vibe rewarding the listener with an emotionally explosive breakdown mid-point, drenched in feeling while making the repercussions of the return to drums all the more impactful. The later revisits his Red Zone guise updating the genre for the 21st century amid a blaze of probing synth lines plus crisp handclaps and an abundance of fiery percussion to ignite the flames across eleven fully energised minutes.

Release: Vinyl – 30th of June 2017 / Digital – 07th of July 2017

Pre-order  http://www.juno.co.uk/products/luciano-david-morales-esperanza/652586-01/?utm_source=t.co&utm_medium=referral

http://cadenzamusic.net

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Ernesto Ferreyra (Cadenza) Q&A

ernCan you tell us about how your collaboration with The Mole came about and what inspired you in recording over 25 minutes of music on: Ernesto Ferreyra & The Mole ‘She Said Paper Bags’?

I’ve known Colin for more than ten years now, we used to live in Montreal before moving to Berlin. Through out all these years we developed a friendship that goes beyond music, we drink lots of beers for no particular reason any day, at anytime, we play ping pong during the summer and pinball during the endless nights of Berlin winter, we share the same love for modular synths and we love to build them too, we challenge ourselves to see who will build the same synth faster and who will be the first on using it on a record.  So you can picture that this collaboration is more of the same, buddies passing the pipe, a few drinks, turning on some machines in my studio and having lots of fun tweaking knobs, patching modules and hitting record.  The rest of this 26 minutes collaboration is just magic that happened at that particular moment… we were stoked when we listened the result of that night few days after …

Buy: http://www.beatport.com/track/she-said-paper-bags-very-long-version/5953529

Listening to you DJ’ing you can hear lots of different influences in the music you play. Tell us about your biggest influences (including any you may have outside of Dance music)?

When I started to collect records was around 1987, I was very young and after listening to Depeche Mode’s  “Music for the Masses” everything changed. I got into that kind of dark electronics, but at the same time also listening to some early New York House.  At 13 years old, I landed a job on a local radio station and had to play radio friendly tunes, but they had a great collection of jazz and disco, so I got curious and started to dig those crates, and that curiosity grow bigger through out the years and since then I try to absorb as much music and styles as I can. In electronic music a big revelation was when I discovered micro house style that still today has a big chunk on my sets and also production.

How did you first get into Dance music, which DJ’s/ Clubs first inspired you?

It was listening to remixes of Depeche Mode for sure, Djs that inspired me were the Urban Groove guys, Cristobal Paz, Bruno Chaix, Simbad Segui,Carlos Alfonsin…all DJs from Argentina.  And clubs like Hangar 18 and El Sol, also in Argentina that had a strong impact on me.

House & Techno seem to be at their most popular point since the early 90’s. How do you feel about the Mainstream/ Underground divide?

Kids are confused, when popular pop DJs and their disproportionate promotional machinery makes them believe that what they play is house and techno music and that throwing cakes and spraying them with paint is what house parties are all about.
ernestoI rather ignore all that jazz and keep on doing what I like. I still believe that you can have some success in terms of earning enough with your music to pay the bills without sailing out and having to play music that makes you feel sad inside.
One thing is true, times have dramatically changed for all of us and we have to adapt to the new way of getting out there. Things ain’t getting any easier for those like me who don’t have that kind of promotion teams, logos for their names and ghost producers making
supermarket music for us wile we tour.

How did you become involved with Cadenza, and how would you describe your excellent new album to people: Some Kind Of Sign?

I got involved with Cadenza in 2009 when I released my first EP for the label and in 2010 also joined their booking agency.
Is always hard for me to describe the music I do. I just do it, but one thing that I wanted to achieve on Some Kind Of Sign was a more homogeny album, creating deeper ambiances, something darker.
You won’t find big room tech house hits. But if you listen carefully I hope you will discover all those mini layers that each track has hidden here and there

Buy: http://www.juno.co.uk/products/ernesto-ferreyra-some-kind-of-sign/547697-01/

Can you talk us through how you produced one of the tracks from the album – what equipment you used etc?

Underwater Lies is one of my favourites, because it features a lot of modular synthesis, I remember getting a pitch modulator / Phaser/ Ring modulator module and right away started running different drum loops and a recording of an old submarine transmission which resulted on those crazy watery drone sounds, then I chopped a few drum loops on the Octatrack and programmed a simple break beat kind a beat, I wanted it to be simple so the track it self could breath. I layered a few snares to achieve that big 80s snare and processed it through a eventide reverb, I used a Cwejman S1 for the sub bass, then had that voice phrase and wrote a little melody around it. Once I had the right notes I just sent the voice through out one of my favourite modules from Make Noise, the Echophone and played with the delay for a while to get those long and wet voice repetitions.
Once I had all the parts, just pressed record jammed for a while and when I got the right one I just chopped the length and that was it. Underwater Lies was done.

boiler roomYou are currently undergoing a South America tour, can you tell us about any highlights?

Is the first time in my career that I can say that each and every one of the gigs were completely highlights, everything worked perfect, the crowds were so friendly! The promoters were very professional and were there to take care of every single detail.

But if I have to pick just one, Boiler Room in Buenos Aires was pure magic! We were all friends playing together for the first time in a long time which made the event even more special. It was one of those few times that you feel that nothing can go wrong and everything is there to enjoy.

Do you find there is a difference in what people like to dance to in South America compared with Europe?

Not anymore, even if I still think that in South America people prefer faster techno this is changing in the last few years, giving the opportunity to play more deep and interesting music.

http://ernestoferreyra.com
https://www.facebook.com/Ernesto.Ferreyra.Official
https://twitter.com/ErneFerreyraOFC
http://www.cadenzamusic.net/profile/ernesto-ferreyra

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