D’Julz – Lemon Juice EP – Bass Culture Records

D’Julz returns to bass with more inevitably smoky reflections on culture beginning with the immense title track, Lemon Juice. To say this reaches deep inside your soul, fizzing with an Acid infused frenzy, would be somewhat of an understatement. There’s just something about the wild abandon loosely contained in this production that makes you want to scream as the breath of raw intensity generated by the basslines erupt across shuffling kicks and snares – feeling succinctly funky, yet hard as nails. Wrecka Stow, then adds more musical flair with rolling rushes of emotion unfurling over pounding beats, leaving the contrasting drum-breaks of Singularity to explore deeper ground while completing yet another first rate EP.

Release: March 7

http://www.djulz.com
http://bassculturerecords.com

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James Barnsley – Big Move EP – Vessel Records

James Barnsley’s bass crunching Time starts the EP as it means to go on. Big, brash and bold House Music that feels every bit as powerful as the title’s release suggests. A funky hint of bold Disco loops into the background as layers of atmospheric sound are built upon the rock-solid foundation, while Magazine Sixty favourite D’Julz reworks it all via grinding beats and bass teasing out fresh nuances. Next original is, Forgiveness which feels suitably deeper as more probing keys suggest moodier potential leaving rugged basslines plus fiery drums to work their magic. This time the remix comes care of Cabdrivers who add extra swing into the equation while retaining the tempting, introspective essence.

Release: May 18

https://www.facebook.com/jamesbarnsleymusic
https://www.facebook.com/vesselrecords

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V/A – Popcorn Diary Vol. 1 – Popcorn Rec.

Four artists supply four new productions for this first volume of contributors celebrating the labels eight year anniversary. And as you should expect it takes and then re-imagines history, reforming music into fresh shapes and sequences. Beginning with Point G’s excellent Love Yourself reworking its sample based groove with new and inspired electronics. D’Julz delivers the gritty edges of About Time next as intense low end accompanies uncomplicated, breathy voices and hits of organ. The acid infused The Scent of My Desire by Amir Alexander features unrelenting, rugged basslines over splashing hi-hats which are contrasted nicely by warmer electric piano, leaving Aubery’s pounding African Song to end this all round great release via rolling drums punctuated by an arresting array of stabs and notes.

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D’Julz presents ‘The Sound of Bass Culture’ – Bass Culture Records

Next time you’re in Paris…
Celebrating twenty years at Rex Club in the capital is no mean feat by anyone’s standards but to couple that with the release of music as powerful as D’Julz associated Bass Culture imprint is enough to leave you breathless. Beginning with his Serendipity probing with all guns blazing then crossing the rubicon via Ron Bacardi’s immensely intense Rock Your Body, while ending up in the vicinity of Mr G’s sublime Transient and then closing with Orlando Voorn’s soul-searching remix of Anonym – Castaway is quite the journey to make. All entry points are covered from the likes of Sebo K plus Chris Simmonds alongside significant others but from whatever position you may choose Bass Culture ignites the senses like few others can.

Release: Beatport exclusive July 31

http://bassculturerecords.com


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D’Julz (bass culture records) Q&A

The Bass Culture nights at the Rex Club have been running since 1997 which is undoubtedly a big achievement. Why do you think Bass Culture has been such a success for such a long period of time?

dj2Since day one the club gave me freedom and trust to invite the guest djs I wanted. Some were already popular but most of them were unknown (or became famous not long after) I only kept it the formula very simple: Me and 1 guest. So we had time to do longer sets. Most importantly, no matter if they were hot or not I only invited artists which I thought were great djs. And I’m very picky on this subject. So I guess the crowd recognised that along the years.

Your label of the same name is about to celebrate four years in existence with the release of: This is Bass Culture: 4 years of Bass Culture Records mixed by D’Julz. Can you talk us through how you choose the tracks, and how you went about mixing them for the compilation?

CD_coverIt’s important to say that this compilation is not a best off kinda cd. It’s a proper dj mix. So having a great flow was the priority for me. I also chose tracks from the back catalogue which I think were the most timeless and as diverse as I could to reflect all the different shades of the label. Therefore you will find music from the early days of bc, some more recent ones and a few forthcoming tunes. But the key was to have them all making sense together and tell a story.

 

DMC magazine review: http://www.dmcworld.net/reviews/entry/house/djulz-this-is-bass-culture-4-years-of-bass-culture-records-mixed-by-djulz-bass-culture.html

The album also includes some of your own productions: What U See in Me and Da Madness. Can you describe the process of producing one of the tracks, including any favourite pieces of studio equipment?

What u see in me is my first collaboration with my long time dj friend: Cassy. I had started to work on an instrumental using some of my gear (sh 101, 909, nordlead x2 ) and ablteton when she came to my studio to record her vocals. Then we finished the arrangement together. This track and a second one were pretty much finished in 2 days. They will be part of a ep that will be release this spring on bass culture.

Which artists inspire you most?

Miles Davis, Prince, King Tubby, Steve Reich… and 20 more.

As you started out in the early 90’s what are your thoughts on the current revival of the House sounds from that era, and what are your feelings on the culture of Disco re-edits?

There always been House, Techno and Disco revivals. It’s a cycle. When a new generation arrives they feel the need to discover the roots of electronic music. Later, generally a new trendy sound emerge and most of the time quickly fades away. It’s only the foundations that last.

What is the House Music scene like in Paris at the moment? Are there any places you would recommend?

bassIt’s never been as good as now. Seriously I wouldn’t  have imagined of somzthing like this to happen. New clubs are opening every month with programming that is as strong than what you can find in London or Berlin.
The Rex as never been as strong as today and there is also amazing new venues like Concrete, le Zig Zag , le Badaboum, la Machine  and lots of warehouse parties.

What are you looking forward to most in 2014?

I have some very strong new releases scheduled on bass culture including my ep with Cassy. I also have a new single coming out in the summer on Robsoul. Plus 2 different collaborations I started with Phil Weeks and Frank Roger. So 2014 will be a busy studio year for sure.

Buy: http://www.junodownload.com/products/this-is-bass-culture-4-years/2373618-02/

http://bassculturerecords.com
https://www.facebook.com/bassculturerecords
https://twitter.com/bassculturerec
http://www.rexclub.com/djulz

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reviews:78

joelJoel Alter
Third Strike EP
Bass Culture

This latest and most excellent set of tracks from Joel Alter are my favourites from the producer to date. No Way captures a melancholy yet uplifting mood which not only pulls on the heartstrings but also hits you hard with a heavy-duty bottom end that is all but nasty. Opposites attract. The Drum again attacks the senses with rough bass, atmospheric voices and an almost jazzy attitude. Ed Davenport then tackles No Way by turning it upside down with harder stabs and fiery snares talking centre stage. Jitterbug finishes with a swing in the tail and striking chords again playing your emotions without words.

release: March 4

http://bassculturerecords.com/

https://www.facebook.com/joelaltermusic?fref=ts

https://www.facebook.com/bassculturerecords

 

Neville Watson PackshotNeville Watson
One Four Green EP
Teng

It’s almost as if you just need to hear the bassline on its own and you would be satisfied, although when the kick and claps hit it all makes perfect sense. Love the way this is so effortlessly funky, uncomplicated yet imaginatively musical as the chords evolve and the Acid gets slightly twisted. The original version of One Four Green was released on Andy Blake’s World Unknown imprint in 2011 but makes a very welcome return today proving that the past can also sound very much like the future. Remixes come from Deep Space Orchestra giving it more Techno feel, to Perseus Traxx who playfully rework the original elements, leaving Jonny Aux to break it all down to the bare essentials. Essential.

release: March 18

hhttps://www.facebook.com/TengRecords

 

unreleased traxxStefan Braatz Pres. Crack Jack
Unreleased Traxx EP
SoulDeep Inc. Records

Stefan Braatz’s EP for SoulDeep comprises of four equally impressive tracks that will reignite that classic sound of Chicago to you all over again. Yes it’s a homage but one that feels fresh with two tracks: Jacks Nation and especially Acid Music each offering their own blistering take on the Acid sound of the late eighties. Chicago Skyline meanwhile delves into a deeper landscape with moody keys and tastefully spoken words telling a story as does the next production T.R.A.X.X which also probes similar territory.

https://www.facebook.com/stefan.braatz.1

http://www.beatport.com/release/unreleased-traxx-e-p/1031327

https://soundcloud.com/dave-t/stefan-braatz-pres-crack-jack

 

Various
Colour Series: Black 10
Freerange Records

FRCD31 Booklet outside Black CDHaving inevitably reached the colour Black the series now enters its tenth year with the same impact with which they began. The music is still first-rate, soulful yet provocative and as you play through the numbers you’ve got to say there is no sign of filler here. Opening with the Nebraska remix of Salvatore Freda’s Luv Can’t Hurt you get the sense of history compacted by a contemporary flair that defines the label so easily. And, as you ease into the proceeding Set Me Free by Willie Graff & Tuccillo you know you’re in good company. Moving between deeper moments, Tech and Disco and most points in between the selection features the labels releases over the past year, along with some new exclusives that notably finish with Mark Hand’s sublime bass-warming Don’t Take It All Away. A second CD then sees everything blended neatly together for your extended listening pleasure.

release: April 8

http://www.freerangerecords.co.uk/

 

kitsuneVarious Artists
Parisien 3
Kitsune

The third album for review this week is by far the most diverse. And number 3 in the Parisien series continues its dedication to exposing fresh French talent. Put it this way if you know of a nightclub that plays such an exciting and wildly imaginative set of music then please let us know? From Toys low-slung and emotive ‘Noise’ straight through to the cosmopolitan Disco of Cinema and Le Crayon, and on to the chiming guitars of You, the compilation breathes fresh life into jaded eyes. Just to highlight the variation FAUVE ‘Kane’ pushes the envelope still further with haunting sentiments and retro guitars feeling cinematic and tastefully mysterious, while the finale from Saint Michel ‘Don’t Bother’ does likewise except with synthesizers accompanied by a more melancholy twist. Next please.

release: February 25

http://www.kitsune.fr/journal/2013/02/downloads/kitsune-parisien-3-you-color/

 

ojaysThe O’Jays
Ship Ahoy
bbr/ Philadelphia International Records

The really don’t make them like this anymore which is why it’s such a joy to listen to Big Break Records Expanded Anniversary Edition all over again. Forty years after its original release and the power of the music and sheer exaltation of the vocals still remain very much intact. There probably couldn’t be a more apt opener that the energetic ‘Put Your Hands Together’ but that’s not to forget the album’s title is about Slavery – the title track being particularly poignant and you only need to look closely at the cover art too. That said you’d be a fool to ignore powerhouse grooves such as the timely message of For The Love Of Money or the original version of Now That We Found Love that sees the ballad sound very different to the later Third World version. Now digitally remastered you can soak up all those soulful strings and horns in their full glory via the original sublime Gamble & Huff production, and hear where dance music was pointing to next. For the full picture and story sleeve notes by PopMatters Christian John Wikane are invaluable.

release: February 25

http://www.cherryred.co.uk/bigbreak-exd.asp?id=3992

 

[1974] The O’Jays – For The Love Of Money (Soul Train) from Nemesis on Vimeo.

 

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