Reggie Dokes Q&A

Hello and welcome to Magazine Sixty, Reggie. Let’s start by asking about your new release (along with Gari Romalis) on Psychostasia: Feel Me Deep. Can you talk us through how you produced one of your tracks and how you achieve your signature sound?

Producing for me is mostly about feeling. If it moves me, then I feel it will move someone else, or at least someone will get it, lol. There are so many things that inspire me during the course of a day. When I am inspired, I get to work. I don’t agonize over a record for long, I am quick to finish once I have something. Mix it and move on to the next. I just think my sound comes from my experiences and growth as a spiritual being and person. I don’t strike out to be different, it is what comes out of me naturally when I create.

What provided the impetus to relaunch Psychostasia Recordings, and how did the relationship and distribution from Clone Records and Rush Hour come about?

I had just gotten to that point creatively, where I wanted to get back to my label. Serge over at Clone offered to help, and I am greatful to him and the crew. Serge and the Clone family have always been supportive of my work. I have done some great records that I am proud of at Clone, so there was a trust and understanding that I was comfortable with at Clone. Rush Hour in the Netherlands is now my new distributor now. With them, I was able to connect with them personally while at ADE, in addition, they have been supportive of my Hip Hop productions, under the alias, “Detroit Westside Kid”. Right now creatively, I am doing deep house and Hip Hop.

Your music has a playful yet intense funkiness. Who are your main influences both in terms of music and also from outside of the world of sound?

I like the way you put that, ” My music has a playful yet intense funkiness to it.” I have to use that one, lol. I would like to think some of my influences in music are: Jimmy Smith, Herbie Hancock, George Duke, Prince. Rod Temperton, Stanley Clarke. Outside the music world would have to be: Dr. Limuel C. Dokes (RIP), Dr. Frances S. Dokes ( RIP) both of whom, were my parents.

Do you feel that nostalgia helps or hinders the creation of music going forward?

Looking back helps me in moving forward in the creative process. I like listening to great musicians and bands. Look and listen to what they are using and the sounds. Now everybody wants a vintage keyboard or drum machine. Most want those cool sounds from the earlier golden years of music.

What changes for better or worse have you witnessed in music and clubs since your label originally released back in 2001?

I can only speak on music. It appears it has become more of a challenge for me to find good soulful music I like, whether it be house, techno or hip hop. It appears that hype has become the norm, and not substance. As it relates to clubs, give me a few more years. I have really just started to tour, so I really cannot give you a true assessment of the European club scene right now.

You also have releases out on Shift Imprint and We Play House Recordings which highlight the diversity of your sound. How would you describe the differences (if any) between House, Techno and other forms of electronic music?

Yes I do have releases coming on Shift Imprint, which is a fairly new label distributed by DBH music, and We Play House ( Belgium) run by my good friend Bart Van Neste aka DJ Red D. For me I just like to keep my sound diverse. On my label Psychostasia, I purposely like to put deep house and techno on the same EP. Keep em guessing, keep them wondering and make it interesting. You have to remember, that I was exposed to house music back in 83 or 84. Also, I was born and raised in Detroit. So back then, we called it progressive music. House music was very raw and soulful. Techno came later for me, but it was Detroit techno: Juan Atkins and Derrick May, much more electronic and futuristic sounding, but still had soul. Now you have all these different genres, and I get it, but at the end of the day for me, if it is good music, it is good music, lol.

And finally. What are you forthcoming plans for 2018?

My plans in 2018 are definitely to play out more as a DJ and continue to put out interesting and soulful music across all three genres: deep house, techno and hip hop.

https://www.facebook.com/djreggiedokes

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Reviews: 180

pokeryouANDme & The Analog Roland Orchestra feat. Black Soda
Reflection EP
Poker Flat Recordings

This stunning release from the label engages you on many different levels flying the flag somewhere in-between haunting and spiritual. Black Soda’s unnerving voice only serves to heighten the tension created by youANDme’s dark fusion of terse electronics and while this may not always be a comfortable ride it most certainly is a captivating one. A Dub and Acid mix accompany the original again sitting you at the edge of imaginative forward-thinking atmospheres. The Hyenah remix then explores warmer elements of rhythm on a welcome relaxation of all that simmering tension, while the equally engaging ambience of the Morning Light version provides similar pleasure.

Release: September 30

https://www.facebook.com/pokerflat.rec

http://www.we-are-youandme.com

http://www.theanalogrolandorchestra.de

Sascha Dive
After the Storm
Minimood

You could use the adage: method in the madness here but that doesn’t quite get to where it needs to be. Sascha Dive’s forceful repetition drives into the heart of the night with an unsettling combination of whirring, synthesized sounds and undulating bass hits along with spoken echoes plus brisk drums. All of which induces a kind of hypnotic wonder that you will either plug into gaining the sonic rewards, or not. Ion Ludwig supplies the remix with a succession of deep, pulsating low-end notes and a warm rush of keys defining extra possibilities that surprisingly make you forget about which genre to attach to the music you’re listening to.

https://www.facebook.com/saschadive
http://www.minimood.com
buy http://www.decks.de/t/sascha_dive-after_the_storm/c77-o0

Ralph Lawson
Lost In The Storm
2020 Vision

Excellent production from the main-man Ralph Lawson who sets the controls to stun on this fiercely underground arrangement of sounds. Setting aside the five remixes which accompany the original this smouldering combination of dubbed chords and sizzling drums breathe fresh impetus into the electronic soundtrack, bravely defying your expectations with this percussion fueled gem while satisfying your thirst care of its brooding ‘Storm’ ignited sound effects.  The remixes then all play on, and around, the theme with the enviable list beginning with Hector Couto, Barem, Shaun Reeves, Fernandos and ending up with Rui-Z. Leaving you with the suitably abrupt Storm FX to finish.

Release: October 3
http://2020visionrecordings.tumblr.com
http://www.ralphlawson.co.uk

Gari Romalis
D-Alpha Experience
Future 1701

Gari Romalis begins his own label Future 1701, alongside Subwax Distribution, with the this typically pounding yet soulfully rewarding set of numbers. The Quarentine Mix of People Under The Stairs begins this set of four care off its warm, oversized kick-drum amid a gentle wash of atmospheric keys. Itz Krazy (Word) follows with a perkier tempo which again engages emotive keys alongside the thumping rhythm section. Next, God of Dawn supplies suitably expansive, filtered ambience across this captivating production, leaving the undulating electronics of Hard Limiter (Trading Spaces Mix) to end this notable debut from the imprint.

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