Harold Heath – Long Relationships: My Incredible Journey From Unknown DJ to Small-time DJ – Velocity Press

To begin with. It took me a while to figure out whether this book was primarily concerned with regret, coloured by being unfulfilled as a DJ’s life in the fast line unfolded, fracturing to the point of almost lost consequence. You could equally add the words bitterness, guilt and envy in amongst the long list of those rather fine, uniquely human frailties we all have to introspectively feast upon. Or is Long Relationships more simply a story of timely reflection about giving your all while having a great time doing so, driven purely by all the right reasons i.e. Love, Art and Music (although not necessarily in that particular order).

I don’t know Harold Heath but after reading this I feel like I do. At least in the sense of what makes him tick in terms produced by the excitement surrounding the culture of music we indulge ourselves in. However, it runs much deeper than that doesn’t it and it’s that very human aspect which shines a light on the highs and lows of musical existence in such rewarding, particularly illuminating ways. If you’ve ever lived and worked in music at least one part of this book’s story will touch memories you have also experienced, recalled here sometimes with an air of mournful disappointment, but then also in absolute genius, hilarious fashion – that description of boat parties alone is priceless. The joyous cynicism on offer similarly does its job by getting aimed squarely at blasting the trivial nature of Dj ego’s where merited, even if names aren’t mentioned you know the type, you’ve already seen the T-Shirt.

The contrast of serious, thought-provoking topics are offset by tales of the more mundane realities of Dj’ing and running nights. In fact a lot of what is written may prove painfully familiar as the tired repetition takes hold, perhaps shaking the foundation of why you may still care so much about it all. Likewise, the earning money aspects of contemporary music production are scrutinised wringing out every cell of financial pleasure that it should come with a health warning. But we still do it because Art is primarily the search for meaning in existence and how that is expressed. Not about cold-hearted, calculated reason.

His understanding and evaluation of Dance Music culture, its current state of play, alongside the way finance plays its role is necessarily spot on. Brutally truthful, yet leaving cause for optimism in some shape or future form. I hope. In fact this has to be some of the most telling writing on the subject there is to date.

Harold Heath’s book is happy, sad, celebratory and fascinating all in one read. I wouldn’t say cautionary because being alive should already tell you that. But its honest, sincere appraisal of what has preceded is both heart-warming and life assuring, even the more crushing aspects as you reach the end.

Buy https://velocitypress.uk/product/long-relationships-book/
https://haroldheath.com

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reviews:40

Aartekt
You & Me/ Girl Get Up
Something Different Records

As the label suggests this original sounding production from Aartekt does a whole lot more than simply replay Deep House numbers in sequence. In fact You & Me owes more to Europe than it does to America with its robotic twisted chords, electro beats and ice cool vocals all going to make this release one of the more original so far this year. As Harold Heath begins to redefine it all it suddenly occurs that this is what the word remix is meant for. However it’s not that this is better, just tastefully different with heavy bass tones and swinging rhythms producing ice cold perfection – on both versions. Girl Get Up then sends tech stabs into orbit with melodic odd-ball percussion and more distinctive voice, followed by Kirby’s punchier take which again squarely hits the button. 9

release: 13 March

http://soundcloud.com/somethingdifferentrecords/sets/sdr006-aartekt-you-me-girl-get/

https://www.facebook.com/somethingdifferentrecords

https://twitter.com/#!/S_D_Records

 

The Veda Rays
All Your Pretty Faces
God Within Recordings

The Veda Rays sounds like they should be some uber cool new-wave band sometime after Punk rock but who thankfully live up to their name and time with this exquisitely late night song. Falling nervously somewhere between Dance and Indie Scott Hardkiss once again dispatches a selection of interpretations which does all of the elements justice, most notably the guitar. Try the full Vocal, Instrumental, or for total proof James Stark’s tripped out Acapella and you may well agree. The Q-Burns Abstract Message Edit then re-tweaks the arrangement for much more of the same artistic merit. 9

release: 13 March

http://soundcloud.com/8dpromo/the-veda-rays-all-your-pretty

http://soundcloud.com/scotthardkiss

www.thevedarays.com

www.q-burnsabstractmessage.com

 

Nathan G
Future Proof 2
Large

Having reached an impressive/ incredible 150th release Large have expanded the possibilities still further with this second instalment from Nathan G, which not only features an explosive cover but has the music to match. Generate Fire creates the sort of impression that something strange is happening with its futurist combination of assorted instrumentation and electronic creativity which rushes headlong to a climatic conclusion. Leaving Come & Get It to twist Disco through filters for a smoother ride, while the Boogie Rapture Remix of Night Time Is The Right Time slows down the pace to an intelligent head-nodding sequence of events. 8

release: 21 March

http://www.traxsource.com/index.php?act=show&fc=tpage&cr=titles&cv=144528&alias=deephouse&ca=top

http://www.largemusicglobal.com/

 

Henry Mancini
Moon River And Me
El/ Cherry Red Records

The legend that is Henry Mancini scored the theme song Moon River for Blake Edwards’ Breakfast At Tiffany’s back in 1961 and is a romance which will either leave you cold, or in fits of heart-warming envy. Personally, I can’t stand Moon River but then it is widely regarded as a classic – Mancini won two Oscars: one for Best Original Score and the second for Best Film Song Of The Year – so what could I know. Although what appeals in every sense of the word, and it’s hard not to get carried away on the waves of emotion, are all the sumptuous Jazzy-Latin incidentals which sound so uniquely dated that they define this particular moment in celluloid. Try the crazy swing of Party Three or indeed Party Four with horns blazing and heaps of sassy percussion. You’ll find it’s hard to beat. Along with the films’ music also come various versions of the theme from luminaries such as Jerry Butler, and Art Blakey & The Jazz Messengers who masterfully make it feel all the more edgy. 9

http://www.cherryred.co.uk/default.asp

Breakfast At Tiffany’s http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0054698/

http://www.henrymancini.com/

 

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