Nadja Lind (Lucidflow Records) Q&A

Welcome to Magazine Sixty, Nadja. Let’s start by asking about the beginning of Lucidflow Records back in 2009. What was the original idea behind the label and how would you say it has evolved since then – what sorts of things have changed in terms of the business of running a label?

Thank you for having me. I started Lucidflow together with my best friend Helmut in 2009 in order to have a platform for our own music in the first place and from there it’s developed to being a presentation for other artists from high renown like Silicone Soul, Brendon Moeller, Steve Rachmad aka STERAC, Funk D’Void to very talented new and upcoming artists.

You are celebrating the labels tenth year anniversary with the release of the: 10 Years Lucidflow Vinyl. What words best describe the sound of Lucidflow and which are the most important elements you look for when signing a track to the label?

Quality, deep, complex, driving, timeless, dope…

buy https://www.deejay.de/Various_Tenth_Anniversary_EP_VLF010_Vinyl__355131

The EP a number of your own and co-produced tracks. Can you talk us through the process of how you produced the beautifully deep: Weltenwandler? And what pieces of software/ hardware do you always like to refer to when producing?

The process is the following: First we do a short energy clearing session e.g. Ho’oponopono & EFT. We synchronise our DAWs via LAN cable, routed through the Scope XciTE Soundcard Mastering unit to the Soundcraft Si Impact mixer. Including all our gear we chose for a particular session. In case of ‘Weltenwandler’ I used the Korg Minilogue & Omnisphere 2.6 (with its wonderful HW control. Thank you Eric Persing and all involved at Spectrasonics!), StylusRMX, Native Instruments Guitar Rig 5, some filter & effect chains, Push Controller, and Helmut used Moog Subsequent 37, Omnisphere 2.6, Keyscape, and what not…

First we agreed on the title ‘Weltenwandler’ which is a new approach. In the past we usually thought about the title after the music was final.
Then we jammed around looking for sounds and atmospheres that would fit the title in Ableton session view and clean the frequencies with e.g. FabFilter ProQ. When we had all sounds ready we start recording the track in Ableton arrangement view as we want it to be in it’s final version.

This usually only takes one take since we’ve been producing together for over 12 years. I guess that’s the main reason why Klartraum tracks sound so organic and unique. The mastering is always being carried out on the fly by Helmut.

The artwork for Lucidflow always looks stunning. Can you tell us who is behind it?

Thank you! I’ve been creating them. I like taking heaps of pictures everywhere I go and use them to create the artwork. In addition the Lucidflow spheric ball are objects we create in Cheetah3D.

Besides producing the more Club orientated sounds you also create Ambient music. What influenced your passion for this particular style? And what do you feel can be said through this medium that perhaps cannot by beats and basslines?

Yes, I’ve been creating Ambient with underlying binaural frequencies since 2011 naming it ‘Turning in’ series.

Initially I started creating them for myself to help me cope with stress such as flights, odd time zones, in between hotels, clubs and airports.
Since I’ve always been interested in neuroscience, brain plasticity and neuro hacks I came across the power of brain entrainment and wanted to check it out. In order to be 100% sure what’s inside the binaural track I started creating the binaural frequencies myself without using any readymade tools. They do by the way! In the ambient drone music I also use a lot of my ambience recordings I’ve been taking on all my trips e.g. Masai Mara in Kenya to give them an additional flavour and vastness.
What this music conveys? It leads me into completely different dimensions. It calms me down, slows down the sympathetic nervous system and therefore activates the parasympathetic ventral vagus nervous which immediately relieves stress and anxiety, helps dealing with sleeping disorders, sleep deprivation, PTSD, chronic pain. It’s a true gem and I am very grateful for this music. So many people are writing me how grateful they are and what the Turing In drones do for them. I would not have believed the impact of this music when I started producing these kind of sounds.

They will even be available on vinyl on a superb ambient label Astral Industries (London) where such brilliant artists like Echochord, Wolfgang Voigt…are
I recently started creating epic ambient as Klartraum as well. Look out for Ambient Attitude(s) from June on. Pretty mind-blowing stuff!
I want to take this opportunity to say to my fans and ambient friends how grateful I am for your support and feedback. This means a lot to me and keeps on motivating me creating new material. Thank you!

What is your favourite musical instrument? Do you own one?

My musical instrument is my whole studio-verse where I am lucky to have all the instruments and more I possibly want.

Where do you see Dance Music culture ending up in ten years’ time – any positive/ negative predictions?

I imagine a 3D wireless surround engine/controller where a bunch of friends can sit together and create their music of the day/evening via a VR studio on the fly inviting their favourite holographic idols to the jam session. Imagine you could sit in the middle of your living room jamming around with your friends and Jimi Hendrix! It is going to be FUN!

Outside of the world of electronic music where do you find inspiration? Are there any favourite writers, artists etc?

What’s been inspiring me a lot is the topic of neuroscience, energy medicine, quantum reality, quantum psychology, yoga, meditation, holistic medicine and so on. I’ve been working out on a daily basis. I love my little beautiful roof terrace/garden where I plant as many flowers and herbs as can possibly fit in and I care a lot for animals e.g. I don’t eat meat or dairy. I feed/water the little birds and insects every day (esp. in winter when everything is frozen I put fresh water out every day in order for the birds to drink). Meeting other empathic souls who care for our environment and see the bigger picture inspires me and touches me big time.

In addition I started a project ‘Holistic Kit – smart tools to renew yourself’ together with my best friend Julia where we individually guide people who are interested in quickly releasing stress, chronic pain, enhancing their productivity and finding their personal way of meditation, yoga, workout and transformation.

Heroes who inspire me are Sadhguru, Dr. Stephen Wolinsky, Dr. Gabor Maté, Dr. David Brownstein, Hal & Sidra Stone, Dr. Ihaleakala Hew Len, Thomas Hübl, Dr. Peter Levine, Dr. Alice Miller, Alan Watts, Nisagadatta Maharaj, Rüdiger & Anette Nehberg, Nile Rogers, Moby (because he’s an advocate for animals), Alida Gundlach, Dr. Joe Dispenza, Jean Houston, Tim Ferris to name just a few.

And finally. How would you describe the experience of DJ’ing in 2019 and where can people hear you play next?

I’d describe it as a Lucidflow experience of resonance and connection.
At Burning Man.

Thanks to all our fantastic and incredible fans and artists for have been supporting Lucidflow for all these years! I am very moved by your support, comments and feedbacks. You making a difference!
Thank you Magazine Sixty for the inspiring interview!

Klartraum
http://www.klartraum-music.com
https://soundcloud.com/klartraum
https://www.facebook.com/klartraumberlin/
https://www.residentadvisor.net/dj/klartraum
https://www.discogs.com/artist/696753-Klartraum

Lucidflow Records
http://lucidflow-records.com/
https://soundcloud.com/lucidflow
https://www.facebook.com/lucidflow/
https://lucidflow.bandcamp.com/
https://www.residentadvisor.net/record-label.aspx?id=3281
https://www.discogs.com/label/284900-Lucidflow

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Al Bradley Q&A

Hello Al and welcome along to Magazine Sixty. What have been the highlights for you in the past 15 years, as 3am Recordings has been releasing music since 2003!?!

Hi & thanks for having me! There have been several along the way, I guess the ones which stand out are the first time I heard something off the label being played by DJs we really looked up to (that was Silicone Soul playing a track from TAM001 at Basics in Leeds in 2003), then Rob Da Bank playing Alex Moran’s “New Fish To Fry” on Radio 1 too, a pretty cool moment. I think at that point I expected to take over the world haha. Gig-wise really the highlight was having fabric host us for the label’s 10th birthday – it seemed like a real recognition for the hard work put in, plus naturally it’s such a brilliant venue to play at.

How have you seen the ‘industry’ develop in that time for better and worse – which I guess may run parallel to the rise of the Internet, easy access and streaming?

I believe there are pros & cons to how it’s changed; in one respect, the internet and digital aspect has really blown open the old level of ‘control’ (for want of a better word) that labels had, for all genres, whereby artists needed a label to get their music out there. People can really follow a DIY path now, so it’s much more democratic in that sense – you don’t necessarily need thousands of pounds to get something out there now, via digital platforms. However the flip-side of this is that artists don;t seem to take their time now; as soon as someone has finished a track, they’re desperate to get it out there, so the number of demo emails I receive which have one track on there, CC’d into about 4000 email addresses, is ridiculous. This leads to a huge amount of disposable music and what seems to be a bit of a desperation just to get stuff ‘out there’, rather than developing a selection of sounds and targeting labels which are appropriate to what you want.

What is it about four on the floor that still ignites your excitement after all this time?

Good question and I don’t think I have a real answer! I bought my decks in 1991 and thought it’d just be a passing fad, but here I am 27 years later…. There’s an energy in house music, people are still reinventing how it sounds, new people (much younger than me!) find it and want to push it forward and create fresh excitement, so there are constantly changing nuances in the sound; I guess those are the reasons it still has a hold on me really. There’s just something about getting some records & putting together a mix, playing in a club, or just checking out new music with a friend to compare what we have, when you hear the beat and the energy contained within, it just still works for me. When I received the TAM088 vinyl, which had my first ever track on 12″, I got all emotional when the first kick on my track played throguh the speakers. It’s a bit ridiculous really, but that’s the kind of hold it has on me!

Celebrating the anniversary is the labels next release on June 4 which features four tracks by four artists. How does the release represent 3am’s direction in 2018 and can you tell us about how you choose these productions in particular?

The release I feel showcases what the true ethos of 3am has tried to remain true to over the years; it’s not easy pushing new artists right at the start of their careers, but it’s something I’ve tried to do throughout. So on this release it has Ceri, whose debut ever release was for 3am (a remix of Askani), plus I’m giving Helsinki-based Twisted Puppies their debut on vinyl. Michael Lovatt is an artist who has become close to the label in recent years, representing us at gigs in Berlin several times, plus he’s an artist who is on the rise, so it wa the right time to get him on the label. Danny – aka Dubble D / Moodymanc – featured on 3am a few years back, so he is making a return as a long-time friend of the label. So this EP represents artists who’ve been involved with the label one way or the other over recent years, plus for Ceri she was always going to be back on 3am and it’s a pleasure to get her onto a 12″, likewise for Twisted Puppies – they’re the fifth artist making a debut on vinyl from the last three 3am 12″s, so that’s something I’m really proud of. Especially after I was told I couldn’t sell records without big names…

Pre-order: https://www.juno.co.uk/products/ceri-dubble-d-3am-wax-vol-2/677958-01/

How did you first get into Dance Music? Which clubs and DJ’s initially inspired you? And how would you describe the scene in Leeds now?

I’m originally from Stockport so it was ventures up the road to Manchester which kick-started it all; predominantly the Hacienda but also The Boardwalk & Konspiracy (!!) were places I went. The Hacienda was the main influence though, I was actually there on the last night it was open too, I’ve got the ticket framed in my hallway even now (geek alert…). Outside of Manc, Leeds was a regular place I visited, Back To Basics and the residents there really adding a new dimension to the music I play; Ralph Lawson & James Holroyd in particular really showcased sounds which still influence to this day. For a relatively small city-centre, there is so much going on – you’ve got smaller places such as 212 & Distrikt which have great DJs on and free entry, then venues such as Wire & Mint which showcase a brilliant selection of styles and nights, up to Church and Mint Warehouse, which have the A-list DJs housed in much larger venues. So there really is something for all tastes; it’s a very strong city for electronic music right across the board, definitely.

Can you tell us what inspires you outside of the world of House Music. Any authors, artists, musicians, writer’s etc you would care to share?

Well my favourite writer is George Orwell; people immediately think of “1984” by him (which is, for me, the best book I have ever read), but his fantastic use of language and his clear distaste for the upper-classes (despite coming from a well-to-do background, which he shunned) is evident in his writing. “Coming Up For Air” is another of his books which still has a relevance in its story today, plus “Down and Out In Paris and London” is a really amazing insight into the North of England at the time of writing. I’m also a bit of a film geek; I tend to watch more films than general TV really; I’d say some of the films from the 70s would be my choices (Godfather, Apocalypse Now, Serpico etc), but more recently films like Shutter Island & There Will be Blood are favourites too. I listen to plenty of other music too, there was particular excitement when confirmation of Arctic Monkeys live tickets was sent to my friend Lyndsey, who managed to sort us two for Sheffield! Really looking forward to their new album, their previous one “AM” is an absolute gem & up there with my favourites of all time.

What are your feelings on nostalgia? Does such great emphasis on the past stifle creativity or enhance it?

Another good question! I’m not too keen on the word ‘nostalgia’ really; what has happened in the past of course is hugely important (otherwise why would I have a Hacienda ticket framed on my wall, from 1997 haha!), but I suppose it’s how these things are done. For example I’m not really a fan of “classics” type nights, where all the music is from say 1989 through to 1991, primarily because that’s not a true representation of what was played, it’s just the biggest/most well-known tracks from that period and it wasn’t really like that at all. I play old records in my sets, I love old records, but I play them within all the new stuff I have – I’ll do it as a little reminder of something from the past and also because it’s something I like and it fits with what I’m playing, but I wouldn’t want to do a whole night of “Hacienda Classics” for example. it’s correct and important to learn from the past, but don’t get stuck in it… When people say “the music’s not like it used to be” or whatever, that does bug me a bit – of course it’s not what it used to be, if it had stayed the same since 1988 then it’d be a bit stale! The whole reason I believe electronic music remains so vital is because it changes and progresses. Yes look back and get excited by old music, see what the early tracks were, that’s valuable and crucial to involve yourself in, but treat it all as an ever-expanding and changing sound – that’s the key for me.

And finally. Can you talk us through the process of creating music for you, from where an initial idea might spring from to how you then produce it, including a favourite piece of hardware/software you like to refer to?

I guess it just all comes from the music I hear and have heard over time – whether that’s consciously or subconsciously. As I’ve been buying records since the mid-80s, It probably explains why I’m rubbish at sticking to one sound. Production-wise I use Ableton; I tend to just muck about with basic ideas of drum/percussion and bass initially, then go from there. Software-wise I do tend to use Sylenth a lot, it’s something of a go-to bit of software for me really. The Eventide plug-ins have also been regular favourites, easy to use and great sounding. I’d love to say I have a studio full of expensive gear and name-drop some super-expensive synths, but I’d be lying I’m afraid! I can’t remember who said it to me, maybe Rob Small who does the 3am mastering, but it was something like “it’s not the gear, it’s the ear” – I’ll use that line anyway 🙂

http://www.3amrecordings.com

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reviews:59

Anthea
Distraction EP
One Records

Subb-an & Adam Shelton’s One Records are about to release their finest moment to date. Anthea’s sublime yet slightly distressing production bears all the hallmarks of a classic in the making, with its sizzling electronic rhythms feeling heavy-duty and inescapably funky. Although, perhaps what’s most enticing here are the deliciously sleazy sounding vocals intoning, ‘I can’t dance when you’re next to me’ – hence the records title. First remix comes from Dan Ghenacia who reliably adds some extra juice to arrangement with more insistent bass, swinging hi-hats and haunting keys. The second is by Subb-an whose apt 5am Remix again delves deeper with throbbing basslines, more revealing vocals, and a masterly Murk feel that always sounds killer.

release: August 20

http://soundcloud.com/one-records/one-016-anthea-distraction-e-p

http://soundcloud.com/anthea-marie

http://www.onerec.net/

 

Hand Plant
Gone Ghost
Disco Boodlbath Recordings

The second release from London’s Disco Bloodbath is even better than the first. In fact, it’s an excellent piece of music. Combining the talents of the imprints own Ben Pistor and one half of Maxxi Soundsystem Sam Watts this swirling exploration of synthetic sounds feels like a trip through a myriad of influences, which define the finer point s of electronic music, from somewhere in the eighties until now. Love the sense of melancholy melody too as Gone Ghost isn’t shy of exploring a rollercoaster of emotions, then Jamie Blanco’s Acid Rework dives head first into 1988 with Acid enhancing the already expansive chords. The stunning, Arpy finishes in a blaze of intensity, complete with nasty sounds and grandiose Nu Beat references – this is nothing short of epic.

release: 8th August 2011 (Vinyl) / 21st August (Digital)

http://soundcloud.com/disco-bloodbath-london/sets/hand-plant-gone-ghost-clips

http://www.discobloodbath.co.uk/

 

 
Matthias Tanzmann
fabric 65
fabric

fabric continue their pioneering journey through sound with number 65 occupied by Matthias Tanzmann. The words deep, dark and soulful all crop up when listening to this extraordinary blend of  engaging music that begins with the strange jazz of Minimono’s ‘Venus’, passes through Monkey Maffia’s supremely funky ‘Sources From The Past’, via twist and turns from Maya Jane Coles and Davide Squillace. Also featured is his own superlative reworking of Silicone Soul ‘Right On, Right On’ plus Alexis Cabrera’s bizarrely groovy ‘Everything’, which you’ll find in amongst any number of other not so hidden gems. You could also use the words stunning and stylish.

release: August 20

http://www.matthiastanzmann.com/

https://www.facebook.com/matthiastanzmann?ref=ts

https://twitter.com/matttanzmann

http://www.fabriclondon.com/

 

OXIA
HOUSEWIFE feat. Miss Kittin
InFiné

Love the Wipe Out Remix of this track from the recent Tides Of Mind album, as it combines sleazy hi-nrg syncopation along with dead-pan, somewhat camp vocals from Miss Kittin extolling the virtues of being a ‘housewife’. Joy. Powered by a huge Kick drum and a bunch of eighties references this sounds like a fun place to be at. An Extended version of the Original also appears (see below) with remixes from Society of Silence who treat it with a much more intense Techno edge, while Yannick Baudino takes it deeper with pulsating beats and atmospheric synths.

release date: August 20 (V) September 3 (D)

http://www.oxia-dj.com/

https://www.facebook.com/OXIA.official#!/misskittin

http://www.infine-music.com/

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