SEFF – Needle To The Groove – Hottrax

What I love here is that this says it all. It’s a mad, crazy combination of ideas that all at once fuel the psyche with excitement and the need to play at full volume. At first the furious basslines and chiming keys may seem like that’s all there is but behind all that bumping intensity is a rich array of possibilities rushing forward from hot breakbeats to heavenly vocal ambience. This is an excellent, forward-thinking production. And you’re going to love it. Next is Burnski’s new alias James Solace who takes a breath while highlighting and then transforming Needle To The Groove into a more progressive, cosmically charged epic. What more could you ask for?

Release: June 15
https://www.facebook.com/SEFFOfficial
https://www.facebook.com/hottraxlabel

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David Berrie – A.D.D. EP – Hottrax

David Berrie’s four tracks amount to the sort of brutal intensity that sits easily on the hips. Shaking, grooving you while at times transporting you out of the building. The title track, A.D.D suggests all that plus more with its vocal refrain referencing: this is place where I wanna be, while serving up a course of unrelenting, fast beats and addictive Acid bass which you won’t forget in a rush. The cheekily titled Hands To Pants follows with big-time low-end sizzling across whirring keys and brisk drums, as Playing In Space suggests the future via a cryptic succession of electric’s. The heavy duty feeling Personal Opinion competes the message care off repeating, blistering rhythms that all at once leave you shaken, breathless with the emotional reward of not quite knowing what happened?

Release: September 15

https://www.facebook.com/davidberrieofficial
https://www.facebook.com/hottraxlabel
http://hotcreations.com

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Davina Moss – Oh Mama – Hot Creations

Oh Mama lends Hot Creations more than just a punch as this heavy fuelled, excitable production lands both fiery vocals and smoky grooves directly on your imagination. The melodic voice of Issa Elle adorns the rhythms as brutal kicks plus throbbing bass proceed to do pure damage to any remianing sensibilities. Cuartero’s choice After Remix follows that with probing electronics tuned into the heart of the matter, while shuffling splashes of percussion and chiming synths capture the rest. Like A Proper Star, suggests the question while returning to deeper notation to provide the perfect antidote to midnight excess.

Release: April 28
https://m.facebook.com/davinamossmusic
https://soundcloud.com/cuartero
http://hotcreations.com

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Reviews: 174

Various Artists
Collaborations 1
Unlock Recordings

Igniting their vinyl-only series of releases is this first of three collaborative productions – hence the title. What’s great here are the range of sounds and styles escaping the usual cliques while offering up an exciting cocktail of ideas. Opening is Leonel Castillo ‘Vibraphonistix’ which sprinkles playful jazzy notation across a suitably cool bassline and shuffling drums all sure to excite the dance floor. Next in line is Jorge Savoretti & Paco Wegmann’s ‘Din Cartier’ which has undulating synths played out across a succession of splashing rhythms, while Fosky’s contrasting ‘Benefits’ gets more rewarding with a thought-provoking array of deeper pads and atmospheres. Finally, Franco Cinelli’s unfussy ‘Mind Out’ sequences smouldering electronics alongside pounding beats to end part 1.

Vinyl Release: July 5
www.unlockrecordings.com
www.facebook.com/unlocke

HOTC081_artworkIgor Vicente & DkA
Haus Boo EP
Hot Creations

Enjoying yourselves at Paradise this season? Then no doubt you will have encountered either of these two numbers during the course of the night. Haus Boo, delivers fiery Chicago flavours direct to your soul care off infectious basslines and sassy drums galore. While the deeper, Shady fuses more in the way of intense low-end theory together with soaring synth lines plus edgy vocal touches for heightened effect.

Release: July 1
facebook.com/IgorVicenteOfficial
@igor-vicente
facebook.com/DkAprod

Autotune
She
Leena

Erlin’s Adel and Jan-Eric aka Autotune proceed without due acre and attention to pulzarise your senses into submission via their rousing My Wife Mix of the title track, She. Offsetting its funkier bassline are sizzling drums and repeating, bruising stabs but what perhaps sets this up to ensure your attention is grabbed is its ‘tell-it-like-it-is’ vocal. The Original version feels breezier in comparison with almost jazzy notation colouring the soundscape. The moodier, uncomplicated rhythms of Circles then bounce around in engaging fashion as the equally compelling Mind Judgement feat. Dirty Paul digs deep with dark voices amid throbbing grooves.

Release: July 1
http://facebook.com/mobilee
http://www.facebook.com/Autotune-58070306253

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POPOF Q&A (Hot Creations/ Form Music)

Your new single for Hot Creations: Lidl Girl feat. Arno Joey is the third to be lifted from you album: Love Somebody’. What’s the story behind how you teamed up with the label and how important has it been for you to work with such a notable imprint?IMG_8412popof4

I composed about thirty tracks, some of which were made in collaboration with my vocalist, Arno Joey, and then sent some to Hot Creations. They responded quite positively so, afterwards, we all sat together and selected what we estimated were the right tracks in order to come up with a full album. It’s obviously a great honor for me to have released my album on this label, because I both respect them immensely and really appreciate them on a personal basis.

Can you talk us through how you produced the track – including any favourite software/ hardware you used – and what was the inspiration behind it?

For this specific track, I started building the rhythmic on Cubase. Then I added the catchy melody that holds the track together from beginning to end. Afterwards, I added the bass, the keyboards, the vocals and the effects. I used Virus TI for almost every single sound on this track.

Buy http://www.juno.co.uk/products/popof-arno-joey-lidl-girl-remixes/612926-01/

How did you get to choose such an impressive line-up of remixers for the single!?!

Well, to be honest my manager, Ghayath Dakroub, did all the work! He worked very hard and very professionally for me to get the best remixers available.

Your music is much more varied than a lot of artists. Who are your biggest influences, both within Dance music and outside of it?

Outside electronic music, I tremendously love vocal jazz, hip-hop and funk music. I’m very open-minded musically, as is reflected by my music. I really think every single musical genre has something good to offer.

How would you describe the electronic music scene in Paris at the moment?

For me, the Parisian scene is getting better and better at the moment, it’s been evolving positively. I’ve seen lots of new dynamic promoters emerge and great, unusual, places open – a nice change from the usual clubs or festivals. The scene’s expanding and I’m thrilled.

As you DJ worldwide is there a sense that clubs are being replaced by festivals, if so, is that a good thing?

Clubs and festivals are two radically different things so I really think we need both! They each have their own vibes and atmospheres and for me both are important and necessary.

Can you tell us about any future plans for a follow-up album, or playing Live etc?IMG_8448popof3

I am currently working on new tracks as well as future collaborations, production-wise. As for my Live performances I’m working on a back-to-back project with Julian Jeweil for this summer.

http://popofofficial.com

http://www.soundcloud.com/form-music

http://www.twitter.com/FORMmusic

 

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12 Stories Q&A

12How did you team up to form 12 Stories and where did the name originate from?

We’ve know each other for a couple of years and made an EP as Inxec & Mark Jenkyns  for Leftroom Recordings. 12 Stories is respectfully a totally different concept and we are trying to lay focus without and pre conception. The name comes from Chris trying to be clever.

Your excellent new release: Bright Lights on VIVa MUSIC features a striking vocal from Digitaria. How did that come about?

Mark & Daniella (Digitaria) had been talking about doing something, and the vocals that she had recently sent gave us the idea for Bright Lights.

Buy http://www.junodownload.com/products/12-stories-digitaria-bright-lights-ep/2927937-02/
DMC magazine review http://www.dmcworld.net/reviews/entry/house/12-stories-feat-digitaria-bright-lights–viva-music.html

Can you talk us through how you produced the track – including any favourite studio software/ hardware you like to use?

Not really it’s a secret.

Who would you say are your main influences both old and new?

VIVa121Mark: One of my biggest influences is Matthew Jonson and to date, is still my favourite producer.
Chris: My Little Brother, he got me into making electronic and he’s the only person who truly tells me if my stuffs shit.

How do you feel about the current replaying of old sounds from the late 80’s/ early 90’s: positive or negative for Dance music?

Well if it’s done right. Then well done. Obviously a rave horn isn’t everyone’s cup of tea, my mum included. Marks mum is full on rave horn friendly.

What’s the story behind your current Night Obscure EP for Hot Creations? And where did the inspiration come from for that production?

This reverts back to us forming, and this being the first ep signed, was probably catalyst behind 12 Stories progressing and being BLESSED enough to sit here doing this interview…

Buy on Beatport: https://pro.beatport.com/release/night-obscure-ep/1617161

What are your plans for 2016?

Getting on with it, more music, less huffs and working on a live set (More huffs).

www.facebook.com/12StoriesMusic
@12STORIESMUSIC
www.facebook.com/VIVaMUSiCLabel
@vivamusic

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Paul C & Paolo Martini Q&A

Your latest release for Hot Creations is excellent ‘Pinball’. Where did the idea come from for the track and can you talk us through how you produced it?

p c 2In the first step we were looking hard for an interesting bassline to make up the track, much like how we began our successful tracks ‘Take Some Time’, ‘Get This!’ or ‘Spunk’ for example. We did find a couple of interesting sounds that when we mixed together and played around with really excited us. Then we followed the unusual sequence of claps and percussion and by that point building the track up became quite simple as we felt we had secured most of the winning elements.

Pete Tong – Radio One Show 13/11/15

Tonight 10pm on BBC Radio 1… This week's Essential New Tune comes from Paul C & Paolo Martini, #ClubScouts sees Claptone take charge & so much more!

Posted by Pete Tong on Friday, November 13, 2015

 

You also have music coming out on Gruuv, Noir, VIVa MUSiC and more. How would you describe your relationship between DJ’ing and Producing – could one work without the other?

Yes, there are a lot of good DJs around that don’t produce very much but these days’ producing has become a full part of a DJ’s job. We’ve been doing this with a lot of passion for so many years and the difference is that in comparison to the early days you produced a track to promote it in the club and not necessarily with your own name on it because what counted was to be a good DJ… today you have to make tracks to promote yourself, so in that sense the scene has completely changed. But that’s ok – if we are known around the world because of our productions then let’s go! 🙂

purchase https://pro.beatport.com/release/striptease-ep/1633763

Italy has a long and important history with Dance music. What were your earliest encounters with the music, and who were you first inspirations?

We get into Disco Music and Funk since we were very young. We always loved that kind of sound and at the time Giorgio Moroder was our hero and everything he produced together with Pete Bellotte as Donna Summer, Munich Machine and all the albums under his own name. Other great artists of that period were Gregg Diamond, Kraftwerk, Dennis Coffey, Chic and Vincent Montana Jr – just to name a few!

You DJ all over the world, do you find that people like different sounds in different countries?

Honestly no! We always bring our own sound and generally it goes very well. In recent years promoters calls us because they know our tracks, of course, so they expect to hear that kind of sound during the night and the audience seems to appreciate it 🙂

How do you feel about the importance of song writing now as compared with the past, and its relevance in today’s music?

p cIf you have a good songwriter and singer it’s always worth taking risks. It also depends on the target you want to achieve. The main thing is to always have a great idea and a great song and if you do not have that it is better create a good track instead. This is a rule that was true yesterday and still is today.
For sure it would take more effort, energy and investment to produce a song instead of a club track with some spare sample voices here and there, but obviously if is a good one it will have a much longer life and better chance to have success .We use to do that in the early 2000s when I produced as Bini & Martini together with Gianni Bini. We are very open minded, so maybe in the future we will do some features as well if we find the right partners.

Can you tell us about your studio and a typical working day there?

We have a really basic studio and work with Logic and both analog and digital instruments. We listen to lots of music and everything inspires us, including old tracks, samples, or whatever brings us some energy and strong emotions. We don’t have any rules, though we often start from a strong bassline, a simple percussions or listening to a DJ set from some of our heroes that inspires us.

What plans do you have for 2016?

We produced a lot of stuff throughout the last six months that will get released between now until March next year. At the end of this year we have releases on Hot Creations and Gruuv as well as remixes on VIVA, Time Has Changed and Noexcuse. Then from January onwards we will have releases on Suara, Material, UNI and a remix on King Street of the anthem Johnny Dangerous ‘Beat That Bitch’ – a track that we really love, so we were really excited to get our hands on it when we were asked to do it. We are also working on a collaboration with Anek that will probably be release on early 2016.
As DJ’s, besides Italy where we do most of our gigs, we have already scheduled Berlin, London and Ginevra for the beginning of the next year so we’re looking forward to it!

www.facebook.com/PaulCPaoloMartini
@paul-c-15

Paul C & Paolo Martini ‘Pinball’ released on Hot Creations 27/11/15

HOTC070_artwork

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Kevin Knapp (Hot Creations) Q&A

kevinHello and how is life in Berlin in 2015?

Fantastic at the moment actually, now that we’re into June and it’s so gorgeous all the time. In the winter things can get a bit rough and ironically not due to the cold, but rather, due to the fact that it’s overcast like 90% of the time. It leads to mad folks walkin’ around nursing seasonal affective disorders, ewww haha. But it’s summer now so outta sight mind. You can tell winter I said it too, ain’t nobody scurrrred!

Your excellent new single The Heft EP is coming out on Hot Creations. How did you hook up with the label, and what does it mean to you to have another release on the infamous imprint?

I was at a boat party in Detroit a few years back where Richy Ahmed was headlining. He played one of my tracks and I went up to acknowledge it and thank him while it was playing. He then told me he’d been wanting to talk to me about a collaboration, I suspect because he’d heard a bunch of stuff I’d been doing with Matt Tolfrey & Audiojack. Funny thing is that it took a long time for us to pull that collaboration together because it took quite some time for us to get in contact again, flush the idea out, and once we did the recording was delayed because I was busy prepping to move to Europe. So something like 1.5 years later The Drums came out and the rest is, as they say, history. I’ve also known Lee (Foss) for several years from his pre- Hot Creation days as we’re both California boys and peeps who love these tunes are kind of a close knit community as you well know.

I’m ridiculously excited to have a couple solo cuts out on the imprint as it’s always been one of my favorite labels. To go from being a fan to contributing to the label’s music library is a feeling that’s just hard to put into words. I’m stoked.

heftCan you talk us through how you produced one of the tracks on the EP (including any favourite pieces of software/ hardware you like to use)?

Most of the work on ‘Not Your House’ really came together almost entirely in one sitting. Sometimes when you sit down the stars align and things just come quickly. It’s almost like you’re creating a puzzle you intuition just tells you what pieces are missing and you’re able to quickly grab and insert them. I remember even the vocal that day came out of me kinda instantly. I remember getting the rhythm and feeling of what I wanted to say down first and then letting the tune tell me what the message/vocal cut should be. I’ve really been diggin’ on Arturia Analog & Diva in terms of software and they’re both used in this track.

buy/ listen too http://www.juno.co.uk/products/kevin-knapp-the-heft-ep/577972-01/

Can you tell us a bit about your background, who you grow up listening too, and who inspired you to get into DJ’ing/ Producing and being a vocalist?

Music has always been around me. My mom was kind of a soul fan (shocking, I know!! Kev’s African American mother loved soul! haha) so lots of Roberta Flack and Luther Vandross etc… was playing at the crib when I was a little dude. In sharp contrast to that though, my dad is a bit of an audiophile, like we used to get Gramophone magazine delivered to our house kinda thing and he was massively into classical and jazz. So many nights to this day he and I will open a bottle of whiskey (scotch for him) and just listen or watch a music documentary about an artist/composer/band we’d like to know more about. I sang classically, competitively when I was in high school actually having three different choir classes a day at one point. I also spent a ton of time being the music got to guy for my group of homies coming up so I suppose even back then writing was on the wall. In those days it was all east coast hip hop for me. In college I developed an appetite for indie rock living in Austin Texas (America’s indie rock capital IMO), which I feel still appears in my music faintly to this day. It definitely solidified my love for minor keys.

Kevin_Knapp_2_300dpi_CMYKWhen I moved to San Francisco in 2000 I happened upon an art gallery where they were doing happy hour parties with a line of 150 people out the door at 7pm on every Wednesday. It made no sense, but people would come down after work and just go for it. At 9 pm it felt like 3 am at any other club in the world. It was there that I decided that this was something I just had to do. 6 months later I had my first set of 1200’s. So, while attending my law school classes during weekdays on Wednesdays nights and weekends I was slowly getting deeper and deeper into the music thing. At the time one of the city’s best DJ’s and the best opening DJ I’ve ever known personally, Scott Carrelli, sort of took me under his wing and invited me to be a resident for his wildly successful SatelliteSF parties. They started later, and were still on Wednesday nights (Thursdays were hell for like 7 years there or so, especially with a full time job), but the acts we got for that little 150 person venue where out of control. Lee Burridge, James Holden, Phil K and tons of others acts of that caliber. We actually helped create/extend the Wednesday night Market in that city, a torch still being carried by my homie Mikey Tello’s (from Pillow Talk) party Housepitality to this day.

So I Dj’ed a lot during that period of time from like 2005 through 2013 in SF and that’s when I learned how to read crowds and kind of earned my chops so to speak. Along the way I sat in tons of studios with folks collaborating both as a co-producer and then eventually as a vocalist too (once some folks found out about my background). I think I’ve had a pretty unique opportunity compared to other producers because being a vocalist has lead me to be able to see how lots of different producers work and I can then take that experience and put it into my own work. It got to the point that I had to make a decision between continuing to do the lawyer thing and moonlighting as an artist or to take the plunge. So in May of 2013 I moved to Berlin and here we are, artisiting hahaha.

How do you feel about the importance/ relevance of vocals in today’s Dance Music?

I love vox when used appropriately. I’m not one of these people who looks at a set and says it contains too many or too few of them. I feel like a song tells you when they are needed. Anything that is value added to a track should be placed in it and anything that’s not shouldn’t. I’ve really been working under the personal mantra in the studio lately that less is more. So if there’s fat to be trimmed, get to cutting, and vox are part of that consideration (Now If I could just figure out how to do this in my personal life haha). Generally speaking, I feel like a couple choice words in a few select spots can often really enhance the audience’s experience. It’s another tool at our disposal when trying to get our personal message or idea out, so if it helps to do that how could you not use them, ya know? It’s hard for me to make any kind of large sweeping statement about today’s dance music. I will say though that it seems like there are plenty vocal cuts out there for peeps to bask in, if that’s what doin’ it for them. J

How would you compare the importance/ difference between Berlin (where you live) and Ibiza (where you also play)?

Both these places are great for different reasons. Personally, I landed in Berlin because I felt like the immigration hurdles would be easier to navigate. There are of course tons of clubs here in the B and thus tons of places to enjoy this music we all love so dearly on a weekly basis. And an obvious major difference is here you can do it year round. I mean, the argument can be made that some of the Berlin clubs are even better in the winter. The energy in Berlin is very gritty. Ibiza is just straight up magical. I was on the island gigging last weekend and I’d forgotten just how special the place makes you feel right when you step off the plane. I don’t know if it’s the fact that like 95% of the people are there on Holiday or what but it just has a certain indescribable AMAZING feeling. It’s one of my favorite places on the planet and I can’t wait to return in a couple months. The vibe in Spain, at leastKevin_Knapp_3_300dpi_CMYK on that island, is pretty much the antithesis of grit. So I suppose it depends on what you dig.

Can you tell us about any forthcoming plans for 2015 and beyond?

I’m planning to get a few more solo EP’s out before the year ends. We’re looking at a few exciting labels for their release so stay tuned! I’m really enjoying having the full autonomy for getting my ideas out at the moment. The gig calendar is increasingly steady so that’s a good thing and I imagine it will keep me busy through the end of the year. I’ve also got collab releases forthcoming with Pan-Pot, Guti & Matt Tolfrey, Audiojack, & Daniel Dexter that will be dropping through late summer and into the fall. Other than that, we’ve got a dope grill set up at the crib and we’ve been stuffing chicken, searing asian flank steaks, and smoking pork rib racks so when not on the road or in the studio I’m planning to break fools off on the BBQ as frequently as possible. Live, Love, Grow, Listen, and Give that’s the plan.

https://www.facebook.com/KevinKnappMusic

https://twitter.com/kevknapp

* Photos by Vitali Gelwich Photography http://www.vitaligelwich.com

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Reviews: 155

FP-Oner (aka Fred P)
5
mule musiq

In one of those revelatory moments Fred P literally transports your mind, body and soul into the cosmos care off this electrifying set of sonically charged, teasing jazziness. The Soul People Music head begins a trilogy of releases with this album, under his FP-Oner guise, for Toshiya Kawasaki’s Tokyo based label and is quite simply extraordinary. With reassuring titles such as ‘In The Mist Of Sunrise’ and ‘Cycles of Life’ you can expect music that probes and searches rather than merely functions as dancefloor fodder. Indeed 5 exists on so many different planes that you could become exhausted trying to figure them all out. Suffice to say you could listen to this album anywhere, most probably at any time, and it would always say something to you. If you’re not afraid of chord progressions or funky, soulful meanderings then try the exceptional ‘The Law Of Correspondence’ if nothing else today and get amazed.

Release: June 29
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Fred-P-AKA-Black-Jazz-Consortium/199546646742707?
http://www.mulemusiq.com
http://soulpeoplemusic.net

popofPopof
Love Somebody
Hot Creations

Achieving the accolade of the label’s fourth artist album Alexandre Paounov AKA delivers a set of finely tuned gems for your pleasure. Flitting between breezy melodies and darker moods, Love Somebody sounds just about right for 2015 capturing smouldering intensity on Your Eyes, while opening via the bouncy rhythms of Words Gone feat. Arno Joey. That playful funkiness continues on Get Together and is contrasted again by the demanding peak-time beats of I Want U, striking a neat balance between styles and flavours on what is essentially a most rewarding listen.

Release: June 29

https://www.facebook.com/pages/POPOF/28281443788
https://twitter.com/popofofficial
https://www.facebook.com/HotCreationsLabel

Brummie Blagger
Outer Circle Grooves EP
Supersexy

Brought to my attention care off the Blagger himself this four track release for Supersexy captures the essence of pumping House Music and delivers it loud and clear into your stereo. Can’t Stop Now fuses Detroit bass together with Chicago Acid accompanied by suitably feverish vocal edits. Next, the bizarrely titled Blagger Rids The World Of Evil Vampers hits you with Todd Terry styled stabs amid plenty of attitude, while third and standout number Keep The Peace gets frisky with the percussion, leaving Blag On Mars to replay familiar synths over fizzy hi-hats and awkward beats. Consider yourself blagged.

http://www.junodownload.com/products/brummie-blagger-outer-circle-grooves-ep/2782779-02

https://www.facebook.com/pages/supersexyrecords/135984879747388?

https://soundcloud.com/supersexyrecords/brummie-blagger-blag-3-keep-the-peace

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Reviews: 147

Single of the Week

wAFF
Fat Gash EP
Hot Creations

waffSo ok, the title grabs your attention. But before you go getting all hot under the collar rest assured that the gash in question actually refers to the artist’s best friend (one Jey Kurmis). Back to the music and the title track is indeed an excellent combination of fiery drums, creative stereo effects, cool pulsating bass plus commanding vocals – an irrepressible production for sure. Next comes, Shabby which drives squelchy Acid bass into Detroit and comes up tasting of Berlin (via Leeds). While leaving the high energy rhythms of Connected to end this great release on a further high, ably assisted again by more captivating vocals, beats and bass.

Release: April 6

https://www.facebook.com/wAFFmusic
http://hotcreations.com

Urban Sound Lab.
Falling
Room Control Records

It’s not so often these days that the more traditional sounds of Soulful House (to use the clique) have anything new to say but these luscious harmonies are simply too hard to resist. Renn Washington supplies the honours with heartfelt abandon and does a first-rate rendition over some cool, shuffling Afro Beats for you to lose yourself in. The Dub is great too playing out the warm backing vocals over the punchy key driven rhythms, while an Alternative Mix adds provides another angle to it all.

Release:March 20

https://www.facebook.com/UrbanSoundLabmusic
https://www.facebook.com/roomcontrol

Sex Judas
Big Sex Thing EP
Marketing Music

Sex_Judas_-_Big_Sex_Thing_-_MLG023_cover-150Ejecting all sense of taste and decency (good) the wonderfully named Sex Judas sets the Disco balls spinning with this trip down into dancefloor ecstasy. Big Sex Thing is all about the feeling and this arrangement of 70’s punctuating synths and rolling bass set the scene perfectly for the baritone vocals to strut their stuff – you either love it, or you don’t I guess. Label head Tim Paris then supplies remix one with a darker infusion of Acid keys giving it all a moody, more contemporary edge, with the second remix from Arttu adding bouncier beats and further Acidic intensity to the equation. Next, Cocksucker Blues again detunes the vocals over fresher sounding twisted, synthesisers amid strains of rocky guitar to deliver another feverish production.

Release: April 6

http://mkgmusic.com
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Sex-Judas/207787179266274?sk=timeline

Ginger Johnson and His African Messengers
I Jool Omo
Freestyle Records

If you love rhythm, and who doesn’t, then you are going to fall in love with this. Life is great when it’s that simple. Historically an important figure with regards to the beginnings of The Notting Hill Carnival along with his own North London venue, Club Iroko. Plus, as an influence on Fela Kuti and having played with The Stones (performing live with them in 1969 at Hyde Park providing the percussion to ‘Sympathy For The Devil’) and Quincy Jones amongst many others. I Jool Omo feeds the percussive fire with a steady stream of sassy beats and life-affirming song, accompanied by horn blasts and raspy Latino flute lines all recorded in the late sixties. Talking Drum is the edgier of the two with less emphasis on harmony and more on banging those drums with horns and rocky guitar adding further tension.

Release: March 30

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