Paris Green Q&A

Hello and welcome to Magazine Sixty. How and where did you both meet and what inspired you to start making music together?

Mitchel is a longtime friend of Thijs’s brother Bram since they started DJ’ing together. Later on the two started producing together and through that the two of us got to know each other and felt a sweet spot for each other in our vision about making music.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tell us the story behind your stunning new single: You Got To Try and how it was then created in the studio?

“You Got To Try” is created during a session with David Stolk. David is a friend of us who we work regularly with. He is an insanely creative and fun guy to hang around with and he has an impeccable knack for catchy hooks. We wrote it as a song, just from a chord progression on the piano. David transposed it and from then on it was ‘instant magic’. The basis of the song felt so good and special that the Paris Green production grew around it effortlessly.

Buy https://www.beatport.com/release/you-got-to-try/2016485

Your music resonates with many influences. Could you tell us about some of them both within and outside of electronic music?

We hardly ever listen to electronic music when we’re working in the studio. We try to find our inspiration from very diverse corners. Mitchel has a sweet spot for hiphop and soul music, while Thijs has checked out a lot of modern and indie jazz. We’re exchanging a lot of music.
So we end up listening together to artists like Frank Ocean, Radiohead, Robert Glasper and Mark Schilders. In electronic music we really dig music from artists like Floating Points, Nathan Fake, Luke Abbott and Kowton. But we’re also checking out upcoming cats such as Henry Wu, Neinzer, Ploy and Simo Cell.
Outside of the musical inspirations there’s also a very strong visual aspect that resonates with our music. We’ve got a natural interest in art, design, architecture and fashion. Because just as music, it uses textures and expresses a certain period too. We love clean, spacious designs that fit to our music.

What is your favourite synthesizer? Do you own one?

We have our go-to virtual synthesizers, but recently we also are experimenting with hardware synths, such as modular synths like the Roland System 100m and some synths that Thijs owns. The one we’re getting the most heat out of lately is the Roland Alpha Juno-1.

How would you place the importance of musicianship and musicality in today’s Dance Music?

We can’t speak for everybody else but for us it’s everything, it’s definitely the fundament of our music and where we try to make a difference. Without it our music wouldn’t sound even close to what it sound like right now.

Can you tell us about how you got the tracks signed to Rebellion, and also the choice of Steve Bug to do the remixes?

I think it all started with Kölsch who played our track in his BBC 1 Residency. Maybe before that, when we spoke to George Fitzgerald at a festival in Amsterdam and asked if we could send him some music. He responded that he really liked “You Got To Try”. That’s when we started to believe in the track. But the BBC Radio 1 play is where we gained a lot of interests from all kinds of parties. It was a bit of a rollercoaster because suddenly you have to make decisions which affect our career in the long term and we have a tendency to overthink everything. From all the offers we got, Rebellion just felt right. And from that decision we also got the opportunity to get Steve to remix our track and to us it’s just insane to have him on board of our first release!

What influence does living in Amsterdam have on your making music? Do you have any favourite bars or clubs that you would like to recommend – past or present?

(Mitchel:) there’s just so much happening here, it’s a city of many faces. Depending on the evening, my favourite venue is the Paradiso. It’s a very unique place where artists like Kurt Cobain and James Brown performed.
This is probably the most geeky answer that I can give but I like to hang out in the public library. I love the space and that it’s really calm. Sorry.
(Thijs:) there are a lot of cool spots to visit in Amsterdam. Such as the jazz sessions at De Kring, new clubs like De School, Shelter and Claire. And way too many nice bars, record stores, museums and parks to mention just here.

What plans do you have for the rest of 2017 and into beyond?

We really have a huge pile of new music just from 2017.
We’re still working on new music almost every day of the week. There’s material for a new EP, but first we have to see how our first release will work out, before we make our next move.
We’re really eager and ambitious, but we also know that we’re just getting started. We’re just gonna have to look at it step by step and I think that’s a really clear and realistic view on the situation right now.

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Micko Roche – Bleu – Subatomic

Subatomic ‘s latest shot across the horizon sees multi-instrumentalist Micko Roche tease the airwaves with perfect harmonies and beyond. And what’s particularly wonderful here is the diverse nature of the sounds as the play fast and sometimes loose with identities and atmospheres. From the low-slung kick drums that drive the delicious opening title track forward to the liquid funk of the proceeding Slow Train the album proves to be much more than just the sum of its parts. Listening to this feels like a celebration of life, albeit without the darker moments, but by absorbing all of those gorgeously breathy vocals will prove to be as good a lesson in existence as any. Numbers like Coumshingaum then simply surpass themselves with the kind of excessively blissful guitars that wouldn’t be out of place on Crosby, Stills and Nash’s debut album, and from me that’s a compliment. The wash of stereo eventually finds its logical conclusion with the suitably pulsating beats plus harmonious words of The Sea, though not before Afterlife performs magic upon both Baltimore and Slow Train on two bonus versions. Choice.

Buy: https://itunes.apple.com/gb/album/bleu/id1216311214

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Kiki, Smash TV & Cari Golden – Using The Music – Precarious Records

This killer track launches Cari Golden’s brand new label in a blaze of fevered excitement. Combining talents with both Kiki and Smash TV this tense, evolving production teases you into submission by the time you hit the first invigorating breakdown. By the time the second strikes you’re already treated to a simmering funk of pulsating percussive elements along with rushes of energised synthesized noise, all of which are neatly capped off by Cari Golden’s inspired vocal lines.

Release: June 9
www.precariousrecords.com

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Arkady Antsyrev – Terrible – Cientoonce

Drenched in rich atmosphere, perhaps the title doesn’t quite do this thought provocative production much, if any, justice. However this creative, smouldering blend of electronic notation really gets under your skin. Driven by machine drums, heavily treated voices and splashes of cutting synthesizers, Terrible is well worth your attention. Remixes come from a stripped back Dani Rivas who works the drums and deep bass into intensity, plus from Victor Polo conversely adding juicier basslines and strident piano hits to the equation on his first-rate version. Vozmozhnost, then sees a return to unnerving sequences with whirring synth lines colouring the background to the sound of further effected voices and insistent percussion. Best enjoyed LOUD.

https://www.facebook.com/ArkadyAntsyrev
https://www.facebook.com/CientoonceLabel

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Sugarstarr – Bounce Back – Kizz Kizz Rec

You can tell when the sunshine has arrived because you get killer nuggets like this appearing on the horizon. Close up this merits close inspection. Take one nagging, infectious fizzy synth line, work it into distraction over punchy drums, then add a jump up and down breakdown. And the world is yours. Happy days.

Release: June 30
www.sugarstarr.com
http://www.kizzkizz.cc

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Hifi Sean ‘Ft. Excursions’ LP – Plastique Recordings

Funny. Just for a second I thought I was listening to music. You know, as in proper music with chords and vocals and all of the things I grew up with. But of course it’s not just that, is it. It’s the production too which sounds just as fabulous loud, or quite. An album of hot Dub versions also casts your mind back – yes to the early eighties. And it was sometimes that that’s where a lot of the magic lay waiting to be fully revelled. Depending on how much you relished the songs on the critically acclaimed (everywhere it seemed) Ft. may determine your thoughts on these sometimes weird, generally wonderful re-imaginings. But take it from me each new track sends excitement shivering through your veins until you end up at the Jackie House ‘Bullets Workout’ of A Kiss Before Dying featuring the missed Alan Vega. Not to forget the blissful dub of Monday Morning Sunshine which introduces the experience, or Yoko Ono’s super funky charged rework by Yam Who. Or for that matter any of the other future sounding Music contained on here.

Released: Mat 26
https://www.facebook.com/hifisean

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Cari Golden Q&A

Hello and welcome along to Magazine Sixty Cari. Exciting news to hear that you are launching your own label: Precarious Records. Where did the idea for the name come from?

Thanks! I appreciate the opportunity to share! It’s been an excited and often exasperating adventure, but we’re finally set to launch, so fingers crossed! The name really came from a mixture of what it feels like to launch a record label and you can see my first name is in there, too.

The label’s first release is from Kiki, Smash TV & Cari Golden – Using The Music. Can you tell us about how the collaboration came together, and also about the message behind the lyrics?

A few years back I was in Berlin and spent some time in the studio with Kiki, so we’ve been friends for a long time. I also met Holger Zilske at Arena club after hearing some of his work and was blown away. We decided to try something and the song was originally very different, but it was never released. When I decided to do Precarious I asked them if I could release it, and they restyled it to what it is now, which I think is wicked. The lyrics are really just a swirl of using/abusing the music…morphing back and forth…sometimes not knowing which one is being said. I feel like music can be like that, and of course the music uses you, too…

Who has inspired your singing most – both within and outside of electronic music?

That’s a really interesting question, and it changes a lot, to be honest. The voices I love the most in any genre are the ones that sound true, not affected. I’m a vocal coach in Los Angeles, as well, so I spend a lot of time getting people to find their vocal “center”, so gimmicky things have a tendency of putting me off a bit. My list of favorites is so long, but a few are Roisin Murphy, K.D. Lang, Sarah Vaughan, Marilyn Horne….that’s a pretty diverse cross section of genres.

How do you feel about the importance placed upon songs in today’s Dance Music as opposed, to say, Disco or 1960’s R&B?

I do know that classic song structure is really starting to come back. More and more people I collaborate with are doing radio edits, and song lengths are getting shorter in some genres I work in, which is consistent with rise in popularity of this kind of music. I get a lot more inquiries from music supervisors, as well, which is a huge clue about what the culture is feeling about it, and I think is really promising. I feel like it’s definitely time for a larger audience to have some exposure to music that has a bit more refinement and subtlety. As far as equating it with Disco or R&B, I’m not sure if you can, at least in a blanket sense. There are elements of all types of music within dance music, but dance music is so diverse that I can’t really say it follows a particularly narrow formula.

Love the artwork for the label. Can you tell us about who has created it and why the images are obviously such an important part of the labels identity?

The artwork representing the brand on social media was created by my good friend and Los Angeles based animator August Hall. The release artwork is a funny story. I’m launching this label with the idea of “lean and mean.” I’ve explored a lot of things, but in the end, I really wanted to represent Los Angeles in the artwork. The artwork for Using The Music is actually a photograph of the side of a dumpster in North Hollywood. No kidding. All of the art is publicly available in Los Angeles. I highly recommend if anyone lives here or visits, to take a day and just visit the street art. It’s amazing.

Do you feel politics and Dance Music mix? Should there be more or less of them in music?

To me, music is a platform for whatever you want to say. Go deep, keep it shallow, it’s up to the artist. I don’t shy away from any subject myself, but usually I come from a philosophical standpoint politically and not a literal one. I do know music has the power to shape culture and to change minds. We’re definitely in a “precarious” time politically, and artists are usually empathic, albeit strong minded people, so there is a responsibility to use this time to voice what we’re seeing and what effect it’s having.

How do you ideally like to record your voice? And do you have a favourite microphone you use?

I use an Audio Technica 4013. I’ve had it for years. Again, I keep it lean and mean. Honestly, I’m not a gear head at all, but if Neumann wanted to sponsor me I wouldn’t be pissed.

What do you look for when signing a track to the label? What advice would you give to someone thinking of sending you one?

I am definitely seeking new work always. I look for things that are classy and a bit off the beaten path. I’d love to hear some more jazz elements and analog elements in demos that I receive, but definitely in the techno, deep tech, deep house wheelhouse.

And finally what are your forthcoming plans for the rest of the year? After launching this label?

A vacation. Just kidding. I feel like I’ll be up to my eyeballs in conquering this learning curve, which is exciting and exhausting. So, more music, and I’ll probably start throwing events here in LA again. Not much time for a vacation…

www.precariousrecords.com
demos send to info@precariousrecords.com

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Dean Demanuele (Dazed & Confused Records) Q&A

Hello and welcome to magazine Sixty Dean. Your label: Dazed & Confused is celebrating four years in existence. How would you describe the highs and lows of running a label in today’s environment?

Hi Greg, thanks for the opportunity, yes Dazed & Confused Records is now celebrating 4 years of existence, exactly on the 29th April were we will have our own label party in Malta. I started the label back when I was living in Berlin and the idea was to have an output for my music and music from artist that I liked, which didn’t have any labelling and just had great ideas to put out. From then on it just kept developing into having an office and a team in Malta, showcasing our artists through events and now pressing vinyl for the first time, this will be for the Summer Blue release. I feel very lucky to have gotten so far.

Link to presale of vinyl: https://www.diggersfactory.com/vinyl/703/dean-demanuele-summer-blue

Congratulations also on your great new release for Tenampa Recordings: Tabula Rasa EP. Can you talk us through how you produced one of the tracks from the EP, including any favourite pieces of software/ hardware that you like to use?

Thank you for the compliment and also for having the premier. The Ep was done through a special moment in my life, it was the moment when i decided to go back home to Malta, hence Tabula Rasa which amongst many meanings it also means a clean slate. Along these years I have been traveling quite a lot so it was important for me to have a mobile studio.
Since some years now I have been using the Maschine for my beats, it has made my life much easier. Some months ago I also got a Roland JD Xi synth which I used for my main synth sounds. I really love the raw sound it produces.

What is the electronic music culture like on Malta? Any favourite bars/ clubs you would recommend?

The scene in Malta is a small but lively one, I call Malta a holiday Island so parties and good life are a big part of our culture. The electronic scene is getting more professional and varied by time and people are getting into the music culture day by day. As a holiday island there are a lot of tourists that come by and that helps influence the scene a lot.
At the moment we are running a monthly event at Ryan’s pub which has been a landmark for music enthusiasts. There are a lot of cool places to go actually!

Tell us about your working relationship with Lee Van Dowski and which tracks produced together are you most proud of?

Working with Lee was very stimulating and a pleasure as a friend and a colleague, we spent over 2 years working in the studio together, day in day out. We both learned from our strengths and combined them to get the best possible outcome. We had many highlights but the ones I’m proud of are the mobilee releases, it was a very big achievement for me personally.

What are your main influences both within and outside of electronic music?

I like to live a normal life as much as possible, so my influences are coming from everyday sounds and situations. As time passes i’m getting more and more selective of my music and releasing music which mean something to me and transports me into a particular moment.
Recently I started doing Dj sets, as of before I was just doing live shows for years. I believe that this triggered something different in the way I think and produce, so I feel I’m constantly evolving.

Where are you looking forward to playing over the coming months? And tell us about your plans for the rest of 2017?

Over the coming months I’m really excited to play in a festival in Brno (CZ) called Spilberk Open Air. We will be having Hosh a special guest along the team. Apart from this I’m also excited to play in Berlin at Kosmonaut on the 5th August along the Inmates team and another one in Malta alongside my old friends Pig&Dan.

2017 has already offered me and a lot and I really look forward to keep on developing both the label and plans and my personal career.

http://www.dazedandconfused.info

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Paris Green – You Got To Try – Rebellion

Breathing like an old-time soul classic the beginning of Mitchel Kelly and Thijs Bastiaans aka Paris Green’s emotionally resonating You Got To Try feels every bit like a great record, right down to its relatively short life-span of 4:20. Time is inconsequential here  as the smoky, downbeat vibes gather their own pace amid unfussy drums, low-end bass and David Stolk’s yearning vocal delivery. Ghost, then lifts the mood a touch with suggestive keys hinting towards a climactic sense of occasion inside shuffling machine drums and wobbly synth lines plus voices. But back to the title track and Steve Bug’s two equally striking remixes with the warm exhilaration of his Sunset version sounding particularly wonderful, while the Club Dub does just that via stripped down beats acquainted with fizzy synthesiser sequences.

Release: May 19
http://www.crosstownrebels.com

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Natural Flow – Floating – Movement Recordings

An excellent and richly atmospheric production in the shape of the title track greats you with an open imagination, fizzy (sometimes dark) synthesized tones pitched notably alongside emotionally sonorous swathes of background sound. A great piece of music that pushes at the edges of high and low intensity this compelling arrangement of bass tearing cuts and heightened senses is quite something. The remix is care of Ran Salman who expands any melodic possibilities while retaining the tracks brooding essence. And finally, Clockwork steps back into moodier climbs with unnerving sounds teasing out your expectations across smoky electronics.

Release: June 12
https://www.facebook.com/naturalflowmusic
http://movement-recordings.net

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